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Below are the 9 most recent journal entries recorded in Academia sans Cynicism's LiveJournal:

Wednesday, July 9th, 2008
5:00 pm
[arcana_mundi]
Attackademia!

Hi all - inspired by my astonishment at some recent reads, I've created a livejournal community for making a scrapbook of hilarious, and/or witty, ascerbic, memorable, or otherwise interesting in-publication academic snipe and snark. This is not a gossip or sparring  site; just for sharing particularly vivid quotations from academic books and journals.

attackademia - please join and contribute!
Wednesday, June 11th, 2008
1:28 pm
[drenilop]
Summer Academic Working Group 2008
We are happy to announce the 2008 Summer Academic Working Group. This peer accountability and feedback system allows users from anywhere in the world to share documents and feedback. Working group participants participate in "clusters" around a common discipline, theme, or type of work. Clusters exchange work on a regular basis - normally every two weeks - by posting it to a secure course and project management site at the University of Michigan. Participants then provide and receive feedback for members of their cluster. Having a deadline helps everyone get more done, and having feedback makes what's done better.

For more information, or for sign-up instructions, go to http://www-personal.umich.edu/~lpowner/workgroup.htm . The registration deadline is JUNE 14.

Any questions can be posted to here as a comment to share with everyone, or emailed via the webpage.

Last year some 20 people participated. It's a really nice opportunity to get feedback from people you don't already hear from regularly or who might bring very different perspectives to your work.

(Crossposted to a bunch of academic communities; please feel free to post to other discipline-specific or personal groups, blogs, or lists via LJ or email.)
Sunday, May 20th, 2007
9:30 pm
[drenilop]
Return of the Summer Academic Working Group
I'm happy to announce the 2007 Summer Academic Working Group. This peer accountability and feedback system allows users from anywhere in the world to share documents and feedback. Working group participants participate in "clusters" around a common discipline, theme, or type of work. Clusters exchange work on a regular basis - normally every two weeks - by posting it to a secure course and project management site at the University of Michigan. Participants then provide and receive feedback for members of their cluster. Having a deadline helps everyone get more done, and having feedback makes what's done better.

For more information, or for sign-up instructions, go to http://www-personal.umich.edu/~lpowner/workgroup.html

Any questions can be posted to here as a comment to share with everyone, or emailed via the webpage.

Last year something like 20 people participated. The feedback was GREAT, and my cluster actually met up for lunch at a professional conference. It's a really nice opportunity to get feedback from people you don't already hear from regularly or who might bring very different perspectives to your work.

(Crossposted to a bunch of academic communities; please feel free to post to other discipline-specific groups via LJ or email.)

Current Mood: productive
Friday, June 23rd, 2006
6:52 pm
[drenilop]
Grad Student Eats 'n' Treats
Because life is slower now....

Grad students are experts at eating on the cheap. Some of us are very inventive and creative with our cheap eats, and it's time to share the knowledge. What's your favorite recipe for something that tastes great but is grad-student cheap?

This is primarily directed at the grad students though those who remember what it's like to live on a grad student budget or otherwise have favorite cheap meals are welcome to contribute too.

Post it as a comment to this entry - I'll compile and post as a PDF later for easy sharing/printing. (If you don't want your recipe included, please note that in your comment.)

Bon Appetit!



(crossposted all over the place - I'm HUNGRY, dang it!) :-)

Current Mood: hungry
Monday, May 29th, 2006
5:36 pm
[miss_shelley_p]
This is definitley not "positive", but it's something I've been thinking about lately.

It seems to me academia has become obsessed with the way things should be and instead ignore the way things actually are.

Whatever happened to Occam's Razor?

Why must all our findings be politically correct or else not published?

Why have we been taught to doubt our perceptions in favor of what "experts" tell us to see?

Ralph Waldo Emersen once taught us self-reliance. Seems lately the more self-reliant one is, the fewer "experts" you have to back up your opinion, the more likely you are to be picked out and picked apart for failure to conform to the paradigm.

*sigh*
Sunday, May 14th, 2006
8:31 pm
[miss_shelley_p]
The Curious History of Mother's Day
excerpt from The Way We Never Were by Stephanie Coontz, 1992 (pp. 151-153)

The people who inspired Mother's Day had quite a different idea about what made mothers special. They believed that motherhood was a political force. They wished to celebrate mothers' social roles as community organizers, honoring women who acted on behalf of the entire future generation rather than simply putting their own children first.

The first proposal of a day for mothers came from Anna Reeves Jarvis, who in 1958 organized Mothers' Work Days in West Virginia to improve sanitation in the Appalachian Mountains. During the Civil War, her group provided medical services for soldiers and civilians on both sides of the conflict. After the war, Jarvis led a campaign to get the former combatants to lay aside their animosities and forge new social and political alliances.

The other nineteenth-centry precursor of Mother's Day began in Boston in 1872, when poet and philoanthropist Julia Ward Howe proposed an annual Mothers' Day for Peace, to be held every June 2:

"Arise then, women of this day!...Say firmly: 'Our husbands shall not come to us, reeking with carnage...Our sons shall not be taken from us to unlearn all that we have been able to teach them of charity, mercy and patience. We women of one country will be too tender of those of another country to allow our sons to be trained to injur theirs."

Howe's Mothers' Day was celebrated widely in Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and other Eastern states until the turn of the centry.

Most of these ceremonies and proposals, significantly, were couched in plural, not the singular, mode: Mothers' Day was originally a vehicle for organized and political action by all mothers, not for celebrating private services of one's own particular mother.

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Tuesday, May 9th, 2006
3:18 pm
[miss_shelley_p]
Swiped from dailyquotes

"You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him."

James D. Miles


Hope everyone's semesters are winding down nicely, and good luck to those of you on trimesters that have another month of fun left!
Wednesday, May 3rd, 2006
11:24 pm
[miss_shelley_p]
Intros and Stories
Oh (der) if anyone else wants to introduce themselves, you are more than welcome to.

Like I said, I don't want people to be afraid to post here.



Anyone else looking forward to the end of semester? Amusing anecdotes? Hallmark moments?

I have a brief anecdote:

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6:02 pm
[miss_shelley_p]
Obligatory Introduction
Aight, so, I'm a firm believer in the idea the company you keep influences you, virtually and in real life.

That being said, there's enough negative things I have to deal with on a daily basis, I think venting should be primarily reserved for personal journals, and I dislike how people use the anonymity afforded by the internet to be complete assholes to strangers. Something's wrong when you act that way.

Someone once said if you want to know who you really are, observe how you treat a janitor without any witnesses. Are you nice to them, or do you treat them like dirt because no one's watching? Me, I try to treat everyone good regardless of who's watching me or the chances of if affecting my reputation one way or another. Why? Because it's the decent thing to do and we all start out with no life experience as drooling, naked infants. Come on, what's more humbling than that unifying fact?

Anyways, I am excited that the internet and a community can link me up with other academics, professional or self-made, where I can talk about nerdy things and be embraced instead of shunned as "weird".

A little bit about myself, I read more than I should. I love learning about things from other people's perspectives, other ideologies, etc. I'm pretty tolerant about everything except intolerance.

As a person/academic, I'm pretty laid back, yet I do all my work and do it to the best of my abilities. I don't have the fortune of being in a program big enough where Master's students can TA or RA, so I don't have that experience to draw on. I have been a mentor and tutor, though. My current Master's is in Human Resources (yes, I hear your hissing and booing, I wanted an I-O psych program close to home, I had to compromise). My long-term plans include pursuing a second Master's and/or PhD once I've paid off some of my student loans and have had a break from school (I went straight from high school to undergrad to graduate). I would love to go back for a PhD in forensic anthropology even if I never really did much with it. See, nerd right there. I like learning for the sake of learning, the intrinsic rewards provided by expanding my knowledge.



If you joined, thanks for joining. I look forward to having you here and reading your posts.

Please please please don't be afraid to ask for advice or a shoulder to cry on.

If anyone's ever bad mouthing you or being overly negative, don't hesitate to jet me an email and I'll deal with it.

I don't want people to be afraid of looking stupid here. That kind of atmosphrere doesn't promote learning or a positive experience.

Welcome.
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